Medical information you can trust

Home Diseases & Disorders Medications Parenting & Pregnancy Medical Dictionary
 Talk Medical > Diseases & Disorders > Lead Poisoning Symptoms, Lead Poisoning Treatments

Newsletter

Subscribe to the free monthly health digest.

Relevant health articles just for you.



 

Lead Poisoning


Lead is a metal found in the environment. If a person is exposed to large amounts of lead, poisoning may occur.

What is going on in the body?

Lead is not natural within the body and is not required in the diet. Because of technology, however, lead exposure has become fairly common. This exposure can lead to increased levels of lead in the body, which may cause harm.

What are the signs and symptoms of the condition?

The symptoms of lead poisoning can vary widely. The effects of lead poisoning depend on the person's age, the amount of lead in the body, and how long the exposure has been going on. Lead poisoning is called acute if the exposure happens quickly. Chronic exposure occurs over weeks or months.

Both types of poisoning are harmful, but the symptoms tend to be slightly different. Acute or sudden poisoning may cause: · sudden changes in behavior ·  abdominal distress ·  nausea and vomiting · unsteady gait or walking style, known as ataxia · seizures, impaired consciousness, or even coma

Chronic or slow poisoning may cause: · gradual changes in behavior, such as a child who becomes hyperactive · decreased school performance · intelligence problems and memory loss · occasional abdominal distress · paralysis of the hands or feet, which usually only occurs in adults ·  fatigue ·  joint pain ·  anemia, or low red blood cell counts · kidney damage · a bluish-black line at the area where the teeth and gums meet

What are the causes and risks of the condition?

A person can be exposed to lead from the following sources: · leaded gasoline · car exhaust · paint made before 1978 · industrial lead exposure · burning batteries · poorly glazed ceramic objects, which may be used to store beverages

The people most commonly affected by lead poisoning are children. Children who live in old buildings with lead paint that is peeling or dissolving are at high risk. Lead dust or paint chips from lead paints may be breathed into the lungs or eaten.

Though quite rare today, severe lead poisoning can cause death. Other risks are the long-term damage lead poisoning may cause in the brain, nerves, and kidneys.

What can be done to prevent the condition?

The government has done the following to prevent lead poisoning: · mandated increased use of unleaded gasoline · mandated better car emission standards · banned lead paint

These three measures have drastically reduced the number of cases of lead poisoning.

Avoiding exposure to lead is the most important prevention. People living in older buildings with peeling lead paint need to have their home or apartment repaired. People working in manufacturing should ask about possible lead exposure. Batteries should not be burned.

 

Some experts recommend a blood test to screen for lead poisoning in all children. A healthcare provider can determine whether testing is needed for an individual child. Testing is normally started between 6 and 12 months of age.

How is the condition diagnosed?

The history and physical exam may make a healthcare provider suspect lead poisoning. A blood test is commonly used to diagnose lead poisoning. This test can detect the level of lead in the blood.

What are the long-term effects of the condition?

The most common long-term effect of lead poisoning is mild brain damage. This damage may be permanent and generally affects children, whose brains are still developing. Behavior problems, emotional problems, and lowered intelligence may all occur.

Kidney damage, nerve damage that may cause paralysis, and even death may also occur.

What are the risks to others?

Lead poisoning is not contagious and poses no risks to others.

What are the treatments for the condition?

The most important treatment is stopping the source of lead exposure. For more severe poisoning, medications may be needed to help remove lead from the body. Chelation is a procedure that helps bind the lead and remove it from the body. Life-threatening lead poisoning, which is rare, requires treatment in a hospital.

What are the side effects of the treatments?

Stopping lead exposure may involve major life changes and expense. For example, changing jobs, moving, or repairing the home or apartment may be needed.

All medications have side effects. The medications used to decrease lead in the body may cause allergic reactions and stomach upset. Other side effects depend on the specific medication used.

What happens after treatment for the condition?

If caught early and treated correctly, lead poisoning may require no further treatment. Continued monitoring is advised in all cases, however. If caught late or not treated, the lead poisoning may cause permanent body damage. This may require ongoing treatment, such as psychiatric care.

How is the condition monitored?

Repeat blood tests are used to follow the lead level until it is normal. Other monitoring depends on whether the body has been harmed in some way.


Related to Lead Poisoning

Rubella Symptoms
Rubella, or German measles, is a viral infection characterized by a rash. What is going on in the body? The rubella virus is spread when uninfected people come in contact with secretions from Most...

Phenylketonuria Treatments
Phenylketonuria, which is also called PKU, is an inherited condition in which the body cannot process a substance called phenylalanine. PKU is an inborn error of metabolism that can lead to severe if...

Poliomyelitis Symptoms
Poliomyelitis, or polio, is a virus that causes a mild, flu-like illness in some people but in others leads to nerve damage and paralysis. A vaccine to prevent polio was developed in the 1950s and the...

Melanoma Treatments
Melanoma is a type of skin cancer. It is an aggressive skin cancer that can spread to other parts of the body. The incidence of melanoma has been increasing over the last several decades. What is on...

Absence Seizure Symptoms
Seizures are caused by sudden, large discharges of electrical impulses from brain cells. Absence seizures were formerly called petit mal seizures. The person briefly loses awareness of his or her is...


Talk about Lead Poisoning

Print Diseases and Disorders

 


About Talk Medical · Help · Contact Us · Link to Talk Medical
Talk Medical Copyright © 2011 Talk Medical. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions. Privacy Policy.