Methimazole

What is the most important information I should know about Methimazole?

· In rare cases, Methimazole has caused liver problems, sometimes resulting in death. Notify your doctor immediately if you develop abdominal pain, nausea, loss of appetite, yellowing of the skin or eyes, light-colored stools, or dark-colored urine. These symptoms may be early signs of liver damage.

· Methimazole can affect the blood causing decreased levels of red and white blood cells and platelets. This may cause an increased risk of infection, serious bleeding, anemia, and other problems. Contact your healthcare provider immediately if you experience signs of infection such as fever, sore throat, coughing, or painful or difficult urination (may indicate low white blood cells); such as unusual bleeding or bruising, pinpoint red spots on the skin, nosebleeds, black, bloody, or tarry stools, or blood in urine (may indicate low platelets); or unusual tiredness or weakness (may indicate low red blood cells).

· Methimazole can lower the activity of the immune system making you susceptible to infections. Avoid contact with people who have colds, the flu, or other contagious illnesses and do not receive vaccines that contain live strains of a virus (e.g., live oral polio vaccine) during treatment with Methimazole. In addition, avoid contact with individuals who have recently been vaccinated with a live vaccine. There is a chance that the virus can be passed on to you.

 

What is Methimazole?

· Methimazole prevents the thyroid gland from producing too much thyroid hormone.

· Methimazole is used to treat hyperthyroidism (over-active thyroid).

· Methimazole may also be used for purposes other than those listed here.

 

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Methimazole?

· Before taking Methimazole, tell your doctor if you have     ·liver problems; or     ·a blood disorder.

· You may not be able to take Methimazole, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment.

· Methimazole is in the FDA pregnancy category D. This means that Methimazole is known to be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not use Methimazole without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. Discuss with your doctor the appropriate use of birth control during treatment with Methimazole if necessary.

· Because of the potential for serious side effects in a nursing infant, breast-feeding should be avoided during treatment with Methimazole.

 

How should I take Methimazole?

· Take Methimazole exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

· Take each dose with a full glass of water.

· Methimazole can be taken with or without food however, it should be taken the same way every day (i.e., either with or without food).

· It is important to take Methimazole regularly to get the most benefit.

· Do not stop taking Methimazole without first talking to your doctor, even if you feel well. You may need to take this medication continually to control the condition being treated. Stopping the medication could lead to a return of symptoms.

· Your doctor may want you to have blood tests or other medical evaluations during treatment with Methimazole to monitor progress and side effects.

· Store Methimazole at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

 

What happens if I miss a dose?

· Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication.

 

What happens if I overdose?

· Seek emergency medical attention.

· Symptoms of a Methimazole overdose may include nausea, vomiting, headache, joint pain, fever, itching, rash, numbness or tingling, liver problems, blood problems, and others.

 

What should I avoid while taking Methimazole?

· Methimazole can lower the activity of the immune system making you susceptible to infections. Avoid contact with people who have colds, the flu, or other contagious illnesses and do not receive vaccines that contain live strains of a virus (e.g., live oral polio vaccine) during treatment with Methimazole. In addition, avoid contact with individuals who have recently been vaccinated with a live vaccine. There is a chance that the virus can be passed on to you.

 

What are the possible side effects of Methimazole?

· In rare cases, Methimazole has caused liver problems, sometimes resulting in death. Notify your doctor immediately if you develop abdominal pain, nausea, loss of appetite, yellowing of the skin or eyes, light-colored stools, or dark-colored urine. These symptoms may be early signs of liver damage.

· Methimazole can affect the blood causing decreased levels of red and white blood cells and platelets. This may cause an increased risk of infection, serious bleeding, anemia, and other problems. Contact your healthcare provider immediately if you experience signs of infection such as fever, sore throat, coughing, or painful or difficult urination (may indicate low white blood cells); such as unusual bleeding or bruising, pinpoint red spots on the skin, nosebleeds, black, bloody, or tarry stools, or blood in urine (may indicate low platelets); or unusual tiredness or weakness (may indicate low red blood cells).

· Other less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take Methimazole, and contact your doctor if you experience any of the following side effects:     ·headache;     ·nausea or vomiting;     ·itching; or     ·muscle aches or pains.

· Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

 

What other drugs will affect Methimazole?

· Before taking Methimazole, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines:     ·warfarin (Coumadin);     ·theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theochron, Elixophyllin, others);     ·digoxin (Lanoxin);     ·clozapine (Clozaril); or     ·acebutolol (Sectral), carvedilol (Coreg), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), penbutolol (Levatol), pindolol (Visken), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran XL), or timolol (Blocadren).

· You may not be able to take Methimazole, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you are taking any of the medicines listed above.

· Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with Methimazole. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals and herbal products.

 

Where can I get more information?

· Your pharmacist has more information about Methimazole written for health professionals that you may read.